Making Science Real For All Children At Deakin University



Posted in: Deakin University, News
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The Deakin Child Study Centre yesterday launched new facilities to support its work in making a difference in the lives of children with neurodevelopmental challenges.

Children and adolescents with neurodevelopmental challenges such as autism and ADHD and their families can access the latest tools and research to help them thrive through Deakin University’s Deakin Child Study Centre (DCSC).

Located at Deakin’s Burwood Campus, the DCSC is a multi-disciplinary research centre committed to understanding neurodevelopment from childhood to adolescence and dedicated to working with the community to create inclusive environments for children of all abilities. …

Toys-To-Life Games An Opportunity To Teach Kids About Digital Security: Deakin University Research



Posted in: Deakin University, News
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The toys-to-life figurines that filled stockings this Christmas, such as Nintendo’s amiibo, are giving children mixed messages about digital security, Deakin University research has found.

The study by Dr Thomas Apperley, digital learning researcher with Deakin School of Education’s Research for Educational Impact team, has highlighted the impact the playful use of data has on how young people understand data security.

The issue of data security was found through an analysis of popular contemporary toys-to-life gadgets and figurines available in Australia, …

Children Who Watch Lots Of TV Have Weaker Bones In Adulthood



Posted in: Curtin University, News
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Curtin University researchers have found children who spend a lot of time watching television, have poorer and weaker bones in young adulthood which could significantly impact their health in later life.

Lead researcher Dr Joanne McVeigh, Curtin’s School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, said the study examined the TV viewing habits of 1,181 young adults over their childhood and adolescence years and related these to how strong their bones were at age 20. …